Psychology

2019-2020

Course Objective

(A) Subject-specific learning outcomes
Upon completion of the course, students:
• Have basic knowledge of the main theoretical frameworks, research
methods and important debates within psychology.
• Have basic knowledge of the main topics studied within psychology,
especially within social psychology and cultural psychology.

(B) Academic learning outcomes
Upon completion of the course, students should be able to:
• Understand at a basic level how knowledge of psychology can contribute
to the study of a concrete societal problem.
• Understand the relevance of psychology for the study of law.
• Understand the importance of social and cultural context for the study
of law.

(C) Social and communication learning outcomes
Upon completion of the course, students should:
• Have gained insight into the influence of external factors on human
attitudes and behavior.
• Be able to reflect on their own perspective of themselves and others.
• Have gained insight into cross-cultural differences in cognition,
emotion and perspective of self and others.

(D) Study skills and professional orientation
• Have gained insight into how their own learning skills can be
improved.
• Have gained insight into how bias can affect personal decision-making
and judgment processes.

Course Content

This course provides an introduction to psychology. Students become
acquainted with the main theoretical frameworks within psychology and
learn about scientific research methods and designs and the challenges
of psychological research. Throughout the course, the important debates
in psychology, such as the nature/nurture debate and the
free-will/determinism debate, will be discussed on a regular basis.
Topics covered in this course include sensation and perception,
consciousness, learning and memory, thinking and reasoning,
intelligence, human development, motivation and emotion. Special
attention will be paid to central issues in social psychology, such as
conformity, obedience, attitudes and persuasion, and central issues in
cultural psychology, such as prejudice, discrimination, stereotype
threat and cross-cultural differences in cognition, emotion and
perspective of self and others. The acquired knowledge will be used to
investigate how human development and health, as well as attitudes and
behavior, can be influenced by governmental programs, laws and measures,
and by commercial parties.

Teaching Methods

Lectures
Seminars (attendance is mandatory)

Method of Assessment

(a) Multiple choice exam covering the core issues of psychology
(b) Oral presentation

Literature

Selected materials from
Gray, P.O., & Bjorklund, D.F. (2018). Psychology (8th ed.). New York:
Worth Publishers.
Richard H. Thaler & Cass R. Sunstein (2009). Nudge: Improving Decisions
About Health, Wealth, and Happiness. London: Penguin books.

General Information

Course Code R_PsyL
Credits 6 EC
Period P5
Course Level 100
Language of Tuition English
Faculty Faculty of Law
Course Coordinator dr. J.M. Harte
Examiner dr. J.M. Harte
Teaching Staff

Practical Information

You need to register for this course yourself